Archaeology

Israel’s rich biblical history can be found in the country’s archaeology. The Jerusalem Post shares the latest on archaeological excavations at significant biblical and historical sites in Israel and the region.

1300-year-old skis found in Norway

Archaeologists found a 1,300-year-old ski frozen on top of a mountain in Norway in September, completing the best-preserved set yet discovered.

Tobacco flowers

Hearth site in Utah desert reveals human tobacco use 12,300 years ago

Until now, the earliest documented use of tobacco came in the form of nicotine residue found inside a smoking pipe from Alabama dating to 3,300 years ago.

By REUTERS
11/10/2021

Largest wine factory in the world from Byzantine period unearthed in Yavne

The sophisticated facility was probably able to produce as many as two million liters of wine per year.

World's first acrobats flipped through the Middle East 4,000 years ago

Next time you are watching the gymnastics, or see some acrobats at the circus, have a think back on the ways humans have been pushing their bodies to the limits for thousands of years.

By REUTERS
11/10/2021

Earliest evidence of fly-fishing unearthed on Jordan River

A new study by Tel-Hai College and international archaeologists showed that ancient fishermen in Israel employed incredibly sophisticated technology.

Archaeologists find 2,700-year-old toilet in luxurious palace in Jerusalem

The extraordinary find sheds light on life under the kings of Judah: "Only the rich could afford toilets."

4,500-year-old jar from the Bronze Age discovered in southern Turkey

A team of 25 researchers unearthed traces of civilization in a Turkey settlement dating back 7,000 years.

40,000-year-old sealed cavern in Gibraltar gives new insight into Neanderthal life

Vanguard Cave is one of four caves that make up the famous Rock of Gibraltar and a nine-year-excavation project led researchers to a sealed chamber with evidence of long-gone Neanderthal life inside.

‘NOAH’S ARK on Mount Ararat’ (1570) by Flemish painter Simon de Myle.

Has the location of Noah’s Ark finally been proven using 3D scans?

The Torah tells us that the Ark landed on the hills of Mt. Ararat, a dormant volcano near the east border of Turkey. The Durupinar site is approximately 30 km south of that mountain.

Ancient Egyptian killer whale with legs identified as new species

The newly-discovered species of killer whale, dubbed Phiomicetus anubis, most likely roamed the Earth's oceans during the Eocene Period, around 56 to 34 million years ago.

How much alcohol did British soldiers drink while stationed in Israel during WWI?

Hundreds of glass alcohol bottles from a World War I British army camp were uncovered in an archeological dig near Ramle, suggesting that the British soldiers loved their booze.

Water sustainability throughout Jerusalem's history

The now-dry Sultan's Pool, named for Sultan Suleiman I (1520-1566), was one of Jerusalem’s most important water reservoirs for hundreds of years.

By SUSAN DE LA FUENTE
30/09/2021

Fossils of two previously unknown dinosaurs discovered off the coast of England

Scientists announced the discovery of fossils of two Cretaceous Period meat-eaters on the southwest of the island, one of Europe's richest locales for dinosaur remains.

By REUTERS
29/09/2021

Zeus temple gate unearthed in Turkey

The Temple of Magnesia Zeus is well-known in the history of architecture. Archaeologists' goal is to reveal the entire temple by continuing excavations throughout the year.

Istanbul

1,600-year-old fountain discovered in Istanbul

Turkish archaeologists found a Byzantine-era fountain while repairing an ancient palace in Istanbul.

Footprints in the sand

Oldest evidence of human presence in Americas discovered in new research

A US Geological Survey team found footprints left in North America by humans 21-23 thousand years ago.

Iron Age gold hoard discovered in Denmark

The gold was reportedly buried by an Iron Age chieftain back in the sixth century. The stash included lavish jewelry, Roman coins, an ornament, medallions known as bracteates.

Archaeologists dig in landing sites of German V2 rockets

The findings at V2 landing sites can tell researchers more about the World War II V2 rockets and where they were made.

Researchers engage in excavations at Bacho Kiro Cave in Bulgaria

Early humans in Europe endured very cold climates, researchers find

Remains from a cave in Bulgaria are the oldest samples of Upper Palaeolithic Homo sapiens in Europe and are important for research of the diaspora of early humans from the Middle East to Europe.

Crusader mass grave in Lebanon sheds light on cruelty of medieval warfare

Archaeologists managed to reconstruct the rest of 25 individuals, all men, and analyzed their wounds.

THE FAMOUS Egyptian pyramids are a perfect example of ancient Egypt’s power and spiritual decay

Ancient religious ritual tools unearthed by Egyptian archaeologists

Researchers discovered clay figurines and a large building of polished limestone, both used for religious services.

Did the destruction of this Middle Bronze Age city inspire the story of Sodom?

Archaeologists investigated the destruction of Tall el-Hammam and discovered an event similar to the description of the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah.

By ARIELLA MARSDEN
22/09/2021

Jacob’s Well: A historic Greek Orthodox church in Nablus, West Bank

The complex – revered in the Jewish, Samaritan, Christian and Muslim traditions – looks like it belongs in the Peloponnese or Mount Athos.

By GIL ZOHAR
22/09/2021

Archaeologists find that clothing was invented some 120,000 years ago

These discoveries, first unearthed from Contrebandiers Cave, Morocco in 2011, are indications of the invention of clothes, and the development of tools necessary to create them. 

Ancient warrior found buried with his steed and his dog

The burial site was used in the early Bronze Age and the Jutes took it over 2,500 years later.

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